Title: Analysis of Angular Velocity Determination Using GPS
Author(s): Paul Montgomery, Hirohiko Uematsu, and Bradford Parkinson
Published in: Proceedings of the 7th International Technical Meeting of the Satellite Division of The Institute of Navigation (ION GPS 1994)
September 20 - 23, 1994
Salt Palace Convention Center
Salt Lake City, UT
Pages: 697 - 706
Cite this article: Montgomery, Paul, Uematsu, Hirohiko, Parkinson, Bradford, "Analysis of Angular Velocity Determination Using GPS," Proceedings of the 7th International Technical Meeting of the Satellite Division of The Institute of Navigation (ION GPS 1994), Salt Lake City, UT, September 1994, pp. 697-706.
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Abstract: GPS has traditionally been a position, velocity and time sensor. Recent work by Cohen [l] at Stanford showed that attitude determination using GPS is feasible and perhaps the highest performance regime of GPS sensing due to its inherently differential nature. A direct attitude rate measurement has not previously been available from GPS, although its availability is highly desirable for use in state feedback control. In this paper we extend Cohen’s work to look at attitude rate determination, something that was briefly mentioned in his dissertation, although our formulation of the problem is somewhat different. We present experimental results for differential phase rate measurements made between antennae on a rigid body, and show when attitude rate (angular velocity) is observable from such measurements. These experimental results, calibrated against a traditional yaw rate gyro are used to assess the potential accuracy and noise characteristics of attitude rate determination. We discuss the potential bandwidth that may be achieved with this technique, and the tradeoff between bandwidth and resultant noise in the measurement. Finally, we discuss the dependence of the attitude rate solution on the attitude solution, and issues with our preliminary implementation on a TANS QUADREX receiver from Trimble Navigation, Ltd. The ultimate objective is to provide measurements for use in a state feedback control system. Initial results from a one dimensional experiment on a l- meter baseline antenna array with favorable satellite geometry indicate that the attitude rate determination is accurate to approximately 1 deg/sec, with a 10 Hz update rate.