Lunar South Pole Region Navigation Using Lunar Navigation Satellite System

Masaya Murata, Kyohei Akiyama, Naoki Satoh

Peer Reviewed

Abstract: This paper addresses the navigation problem for a moving object at the lunar South Pole region using our Lunar Navigation Satellite System (LNSS). The LNSS is a satellite constellation system under planning by the JAXA to provide the communication, positioning, navigation, and timing (CPNT) service at the South Pole region. The LNSS is a GPS-like system and eight LNSS satellites to be deployed in two elliptical lunar frozen orbits (ELFOs) will broadcast the navigation signals towards the South Pole region in the same way as the GPS. In this paper, we investigate the LNSS navigation accuracy for a moving object at the South Pole region and evaluate the achievable positioning accuracy using the LNSS pseudo range and pseudorange-rate (Doppler) measurements. Our simulation results showed that for an object moving with a velocity of 3 m/s, 10 meter-level horizontal positioning accuracy was attainable after the filter convergence of about one hour. The same level of positioning accuracy was also achievable when only the six LNSS satellites were available, although the convergence time became much longer such as three or four hours. After varying parameters, we found that for the successful South Pole region navigation, high-frequency filtering, high-quality pseudorange-rate measurements, and the sufficient number of the LNSS satellites would be desired.
Published in: Proceedings of the 36th International Technical Meeting of the Satellite Division of The Institute of Navigation (ION GNSS+ 2023)
September 11 - 15, 2023
Hyatt Regency Denver
Denver, Colorado
Pages: 3589 - 3596
Cite this article: Murata, Masaya, Akiyama, Kyohei, Satoh, Naoki, "Lunar South Pole Region Navigation Using Lunar Navigation Satellite System," Proceedings of the 36th International Technical Meeting of the Satellite Division of The Institute of Navigation (ION GNSS+ 2023), Denver, Colorado, September 2023, pp. 3589-3596. https://doi.org/10.33012/2023.19267
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