Title: Hostile MAVs: Resiliency Considerations in the Transportation Sector
Author(s): Andrew Hansen
Published in: Proceedings of the 30th International Technical Meeting of The Satellite Division of the Institute of Navigation (ION GNSS+ 2017)
September 25 - 29, 2017
Oregon Convention Center
Portland, Oregon
Pages: 2648 - 2663
Cite this article: Hansen, Andrew, "Hostile MAVs: Resiliency Considerations in the Transportation Sector," Proceedings of the 30th International Technical Meeting of The Satellite Division of the Institute of Navigation (ION GNSS+ 2017), Portland, Oregon, September 2017, pp. 2648-2663.
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Abstract: MAVs: Threat Resiliency Considerations in the Transportation Sector Maturing autonomous vehicles (AV) technology brings a rich field of opportunity as well as challenge. The transportation sector stands to benefit greatly from the progression of automation to autonomy particularly in aviation. While technical hurdles are steadily being cleared, the unintended consequences of technology advancement bring the need for practitioners and policy makers to address the social, environmental, and safety/security aspects of autonomous vehicles more deeply. We posit a set of key dimensions for maturing that discussion and then proceed to some specifics in the safety and security aspects using the micro-aerial vehicle (MAV) scenario in the transportation infrastructure context. - Actors: swarm v individual - Vulnerable elements: fixed v mobile, economic v safety, communication v material v espionage - Threat motivators: informed (intended) v natural (unintentional) - Detection mechanisms: visual v audible v RF - Mitigation mechanisms: physical v electronic v passive Our discussion here is framed by the aviation safety case paradigm, a successful approach in other critical transportation initiatives. At coarsest, the safety case can be thought of as a [possibly iterative] progression of threat characterization followed by risk acceptance/mitigation trades which then lead to feasibility evaluation amidst economic and environmental constraints. The objective in suggesting this process is to gain agreement across stakeholders and experts on not only these key dimensions but also in the allocation of resources to more effectively improve transportation resiliency.