Title: Multi-receiver GPS Based Direct Time Estimation for PMUs
Author(s): Sriramya Bhamidipati, Yuting Ng, Grace Xingxin Gao
Published in: Proceedings of the 29th International Technical Meeting of The Satellite Division of the Institute of Navigation (ION GNSS+ 2016)
September 12 - 16, 2016
Oregon Convention Center
Portland, Oregon
Pages: 833 - 837
Cite this article: Bhamidipati, Sriramya, Ng, Yuting, Gao, Grace Xingxin, "Multi-receiver GPS Based Direct Time Estimation for PMUs," Proceedings of the 29th International Technical Meeting of The Satellite Division of the Institute of Navigation (ION GNSS+ 2016), Portland, Oregon, September 2016, pp. 833-837.
Full Paper: ION Members/Non-Members: 1 Download Credit
Sign In
Abstract: Modern power distribution systems are incorporating Phasor Measurement Units (PMUs) to measure the instantaneous voltage and current phasors at different nodes in the power grid. These PMU devices depend on GPS for precise time and synchronization. However, GPS L1 C/A signals are vulnerable because of its low power and unencrypted signal structure. Therefore, there is a need for the development of robust time transfer techniques to ensure power grid stability. We propose a novel multi-receiver direct time estimation (MRDTE) algorithm by utilizing the measurements from multiple receivers triggered by a common clock. We first implement a novel signal processing technique known as the Direct Time Estimation (DTE) that directly correlates the received GPS signal with the corresponding signal replica for each of the pre-generated set of clock states. The most optimal set of clock candidates is then estimated based on the principle of maximum likelihood estimation. By leveraging upon the known geographical diversity of multiple receiver positions, we employ a overall Kalman Filter to obtain a robust corrected clock bias and clock drift at any instant. We demonstrate the increased resilience of our MRDTE algorithm against malicious timing attacks that include jamming and meaconing through outdoor field experiments.