Applications of GPS Determined Attitude for Navigation

Inge Nesba

Abstract: GPS has a significant advantage over the other navigation systems, by being a complete system. By utilizing the GPS signals in a optimum way, we can derive time, position, velocity and attitude from a high accuracy single source, with no need for input from complementary sensors such as inertial systems or doppler sonars. Various tests have been done at GECO A/5, Norway to study the accuracy of attitude as derived from GPS. TI-4100 receivers and TRIMBLE 4000SX receivers have been used in static tests. By interchange of antennas during the observations, the multipath effects have been isolated from other error sources. Errors from multipath have also been verified by studying day-to-day correlation caused by repetition of the satellite-to-antenna geometries. In the following static test antennae with ground plane were used in order to reduce the effects from multipath. This paper discusses mathematical models and receiver design for the reduction of tropospheric refraction. Uncorrected tropo­spheric refraction can be a serious source of errors for attitude determination, as the bending of the GPS signal path is about 1 degree at the horizon. In December 1987 two TRIMBLE 4000SX receivers were used on the seismic vessel GECO GAMMA for a dynamic test of attitude determination. The antennae were mounted on both sides of the helideck in order to measure heading and roll. We made comparisons of GPS derived azimuth and azimuth from logged gyro by post processing of the data. The paper discusses methods for real­time determination of the carrier phase ambiguity.
Published in: Proceedings of the International Technical Meeting of the Satellite Division of The Institute of Navigation (ION GPS 1988)
September 19 - 23, 1988
The Broadmoor Hotel
Colorado Spring, CO
Pages: 95 - 100
Cite this article: Nesba, Inge, "Applications of GPS Determined Attitude for Navigation," Proceedings of the International Technical Meeting of the Satellite Division of The Institute of Navigation (ION GPS 1988), Colorado Spring, CO, September 1988, pp. 95-100.
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