THE APPLICATION OF RADIOTELEPHONY TO THE NAVIGATIONAL AND OPERATIONAL NEEDS OF THE MARITIME SERVICE

C. M. Jansky, Jr.

Peer Reviewed

Abstract: In every city or community of any size and throughout many of our states, police scout cars and motorcycles are so equipped with radiotelephony that contact can be established by, and intercommunication maintained between headquarters and mobile units, and in most instances between the mobile units themselves. In every community of any size the movement of taxicabs is controlled and dispatched by radiotelephony. All commercial aircraft, all military aircraft, and practically all private aircraft are so equipped that they are a part of a common plane-to-ground and some times plane-to-plane radiotelephone system used for dispatching traffic, for control, and other purposes. Yet today most of the shipping which navigates our seacoasts and rivers is both deaf and dumb with respect to the ability of those who control the movement of vessels to contact and communicate promptly by radiotelephony with each other and with the shore points concerned with their operations. Only on the Great Lakes does there exist a radiotelephone system designed primarily to meet the needs of the mariner.
Published in: NAVIGATION, Journal of the Institute of Navigation, Volume 3, Number 10
Pages: 359 - 363
Cite this article: Jansky, C. M., Jr.,, "THE APPLICATION OF RADIOTELEPHONY TO THE NAVIGATIONAL AND OPERATIONAL NEEDS OF THE MARITIME SERVICE", NAVIGATION, Journal of The Institute of Navigation, Vol. 3, No. 10, 1953, pp. 359-363.
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