A SURVEY OF THE EFFORTS TO DETERMINE LONGITUDE AT SEA, 1660-1760. PART III: A PERFECT TIMEKEEPER

Seymour L. Chapin

Peer Reviewed

Abstract: The preceding article of this series was devoted to a discussion of various methods proposing to make use of celestial phenomena in order to obtain standard time at sea. The relationship between longitude and time would seem to suggest immediately that the best method of determining longitude would be to carry some clock or other timekeeper on board which would give the standard time, and hence, the actual longitude of the ship. This method had, in fact, been suggested by Gemma Frisius in a tract entitled De Principiis Astronomiae et Cosmographiae, printed at Antwerp in 1530.
Published in: NAVIGATION, Journal of the Institute of Navigation, Volume 3, Number 8
Pages: 296 - 303
Cite this article: Chapin, Seymour L., "A SURVEY OF THE EFFORTS TO DETERMINE LONGITUDE AT SEA, 1660-1760. PART III: A PERFECT TIMEKEEPER", NAVIGATION, Journal of The Institute of Navigation, Vol. 3, No. 8, 1953, pp. 296-303.
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