THE ROLE OF COMMUNICATION IN AIR NAVIGATION AND TRAFFIC CONTROL

Nathaniel Braverman

Peer Reviewed

Abstract: Since approximately 1930 communication facilities have been the servant of air navigators and air traffic controllers. Most of these facilities permitted two-way voice transmission between the aircraft and ground stations. This use of radio-telephone transmission provided an inherent flexibility which permitted the communication system to expand and adapt itself to changing needs as the federal airways and airport traffic control environments developed. As procedures changed and became more complex, the pilots and traffic controllers revised and expanded their "lingo" but the communication facilities remained essentially the same. However, the time has come when we must examine more carefully the role of communication in modern and future aviation.
Published in: NAVIGATION, Journal of the Institute of Navigation, Volume 5, Number 3
Pages: 133 - 137
Cite this article: Braverman, Nathaniel, "THE ROLE OF COMMUNICATION IN AIR NAVIGATION AND TRAFFIC CONTROL", NAVIGATION, Journal of The Institute of Navigation, Vol. 5, No. 3, 1956, pp. 133-137.
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