WEATHER INFORMATION AS AN AIR NAVIGATION AID ON THE POLAR ROUTE

John Larsen

Peer Reviewed

Abstract: As we enter the age of space travel it appears that we should have now perfected our geonavigation to a high degree of proficiency. Our thinking should be toward broad universal references of navigational factors. Constant observation of atmospheric phenomena resulting in well anticipated meteorological developments throughout our sphere, or even our Western hemisphere, is, unfortunately, far from a reality. At this time, in airline navigation, we are only beginning the accomplishment of two major levels of progress. Our first requirement is the operation of long-range flights, 4,000 to more than 5,000 miles, through the higher latitudes, with piston engine powered aircraft. The second requirement is the operation of high-speed jet aircraft on flights of less than 4,000 miles.
Published in: NAVIGATION, Journal of the Institute of Navigation, Volume 6, Number 2
Pages: 86 - 88
Cite this article: Larsen, John, "WEATHER INFORMATION AS AN AIR NAVIGATION AID ON THE POLAR ROUTE", NAVIGATION, Journal of The Institute of Navigation, Vol. 6, No. 2, 1958, pp. 86-88.
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