SOME CONSIDERATIONS IN DETERMINING THE ROLE OF SATELLITES IN AIR NAVIGATION

David J. Sheftel

Peer Reviewed

Abstract: THE CONTINUALLY GROWING air transport industry has generated the need for more efficient use of air space, particularly in certain geographical areas. Since increased traffic density is expect to rapidly saturate the present system of air traffic control in certain sections of the world, it becomes necessary to develop a clear understanding of future operational requirements and apply new technology where necessary. Satellite technology has rapidly advanced in the recent past to a level where it can be assumed that certain specific functions which may be required in a future air traffic system is not a simple one. The combination of aircraft and ground facilities is a dynamic complex composed of many closely interrelated variables. To define the parts of a future system of this sort, it is necessary to first establish what overall capability will be needed, and then to determine and weigh the alternate ways of satisfying the need, considering the technical, operational, economic, and international aspects. In considering satellite technology for fulfilling air traffic system functions, it is safe to predict that hardware can be designed which will serve functions such as navigation, communication and position finding. It can also be predicted that these requirements can be served by techniques other than satellites. Since neither the technology nor the system characteristics have yet been fully explored, the task of the immediate future is to further investigate alternate techniques and to continue operational system studies. The subject of this paper, therefore, concerns the status of work in these areas, with particular emphasis on satellites.
Published in: NAVIGATION, Journal of the Institute of Navigation, Volume 13, Number 2
Pages: 166 - 173
Cite this article: Sheftel, David J., "SOME CONSIDERATIONS IN DETERMINING THE ROLE OF SATELLITES IN AIR NAVIGATION", NAVIGATION, Journal of The Institute of Navigation, Vol. 13, No. 2, Summer 1966, pp. 166-173.
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