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Session C4: Alternative/Terrestrial-based Opportunistic PNT

A Simple Transmitter and Control Configuration for Indigenous Localization
Ya-Tzu Hung and Jyh-Ching Juang, Department of Electrical Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Taiwan
Location: Windjammer

In the paper, the design, simulation, and experiment of an indigenous localization system based on a simple transmitter and control configuration are discussed.
Even though the GNSS (Global Navigation Satellite System) has been utilized to facilitate accurate timing and position information in almost every sector in the societal infrastructure. It is known that the GNSS is typically subject to two main limitations, which are susceptibility to jamming/spoofing and cease of operation in obstructed environment. To address the above limitations, an indigenous localization is designed in the paper with the aim to provide complementary positioning and navigation service in an indoor or GNSS-challenge environment. To some extent, the indigenous localization system is designed to mimic some operations of GNSS. A fundamental design issue in GNSS is the maintenance of the system time which is typically accomplished by the master station and a set of monitoring stations. As low-cost deployment and ad hoc operation are design objectives of the indigenous localization system, the system operates by using a set of unsynchronized transmitters and without reference time-tag information. As a result, the system is simple to setup. In the design, a reference receiver is utilized to provide assistance information that contains the clock error parameters of the transmitters. The information are made available to rover receivers through a web server. The localization process, however, is required to resolve one additional unknown of the time difference in addition to the position and clock bias. The localization performance of the system is
assessed in terms of Cramer-Rao lower bound and simulation analysis results are provided for comparison. To verify the design, an experiment is setup in which software defined radios are used to implement the signal transmission and reception features. It is found that the system is capable of providing indigenous localization function with acceptable performance.



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