JNC Tutorials

Pre-conference tutorials have been organized to provide in-depth learning prior to the start of the technical program. Course materials are the intellectual property of the instructor; an electronic copy of notes may be be made available for download by qualified attendees from the meeting website at the instructor’s discretion.

Tutorials are included with the cost of a full registration. ION reserves the right to cancel a portion of the tutorial program based on availability of the instructor.

Monday, July 8: 10:30 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.
Advanced Celestial Navigation Systems for Warfighter Platforms
Dr. J.P. Laine
Precise Timekeeping and Applications
Dr. John H. Burke
DOD PNT Architecture Standard (PNTAS)
Samuel Griffin
GPS 101
Dr. John Raquet
Monday, July 8: 1:30 p.m. - 3:00 p.m.
GPS Resilience for the Warfighter
John Clark
An Introduction to Cryptography with Attention to Navigation
Dr. Jim Gillis and Dr. Joe J. Rushanan
DOD PNT Architecture Standard (PNTAS)
Samuel Griffin
PNT Gaps for Autonomous Applications
Dr. Rob Leishman

Advanced Celestial Navigation Systems for Warfighter Platforms

Time: Monday, July 8, 10:30 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.

This course will present a discussion on celestial navigation techniques and system implementations, in the modern context. The course will consider air, sea and land operations, and explore celestial navigation technology solutions that are available today or in the near future. This course will appeal to R&D and systems engineers, managers and executives, and is accessible to both experienced and novice practitioners.

Dr. J.P. Laine Dr. J.P. Laine is the division leader for Positioning, Navigation and Timing (PNT) at Draper where he leads the development of advanced PNT technology solutions, as well as optical sensor systems, with a specific focus on rapid implementation of novel technologies into new system concepts. Dr. Laine has held technical leadership roles on a variety of programs related to PNT, imaging, and free-space/guided wave optics. Dr. Laine is the author of many scientific papers and holds several patents in the field of optical sensing.

12:00 p.m. - 1:30 p.m., Lunch is on your own.




Precise Timekeeping and Applications

Time: Monday, July 8, 10:30 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.

Atomic frequency standards provide the ultimate source of accuracy and stability for all modern communications, navigation, and time-keeping systems. Commercially available "Industrial" atomic clocks, including cesium beam frequency standards, rubidium oscillators, and hydrogen masers, are based on technology originally developed in the 1950s. Since that time, technology evolution and field experience have led to a level of performance and reliability that atomic clocks are now deployed throughout critical infrastructure applications. With the advent of GPS and, consequently, global availability of precision timing, new applications for precision timing have emerged, with ever increasing demands for improved precision, robustness, and portability. In parallel, we are, at present, experiencing a renaissance of atomic timekeeping, as modern techniques of atomic and laser physics have enabled new techniques for confining, interrogating, and exploiting precision atomic timing signals. This tutorial will introduce existing and emerging atomic clock technologies. The first half of the tutorial will focus on time keeping technologies including commercial technology and technology under development. The second half will focus on applications of time and frequency.

Dr. John H. Burke Dr. John H. Burke is a program manager at DARPA in the Microsystems Technology Office managing programs to develop navigation, timing and magnetic sensing devices including the Atomic Clock with Enhanced Stability (ACES) program and Atomic-Photonic Integration (A-PhI) Program. Prior to this, he worked at the Air Force Research Laboratory's Space Vehicles Directorate, working on a combination of cold-atom inertial navigation and optical atomic clocks. The latter topic utilizes advanced photonic devices such as frequency combs to create very stable, low-phase-noise microwaves for a variety of applications. Dr. Burke received his PhD in 2010 from University of Virginia in Atomic Physics, for developing a proof-of-principle gyroscope using coherent matter waves sourced from a Bose-condensed, laser-cooled source.

12:00 p.m. - 1:30 p.m., Lunch is on your own.




DOD PNT Architecture Standard (PNTAS)

Time: Monday, July 8, 10:30 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.

Description Pending Public Release

Samuel Griffin Samuel Griffin is a digital engineer at Booz Allen Hamilton where he is the chief architect on the PNT Architecture Standard (PNTAS) development effort. Mr. Griffin’s experience spans multiple enterprises, including military satellite communications; remote sensing; range and networks; and positioning, navigation and timing; working in interoperability requirements capture; net-readiness; and enterprise and systems integration roles. Mr. Griffin has an MBA in Space Systems Management from the University of Colorado.


12:00 p.m. - 1:30 p.m., Lunch is on your own.




GPS 101

Time: Monday, July 8, 10:30 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.

This course presents the fundamentals of the GPS, and other GNSS, and is intended for people with a technical background who do not have significant GPS experience. Topics covered include time-of-arrival positioning, overall system design of GPS, signal structure, error characterization, Dilution of Precision (DOP), differential GPS, GPS modernization, and other GNSS systems.

Dr. John Raquet Dr. John Raquet is the director of the Autonomy and Navigation Technology (ANT) Center at the Air Force Institute of Technology, where he is also a professor of electrical engineering. He has been involved in navigation-related research for over 25 years, has published over 160 navigation-related conference and journal papers and taught over 60 navigation-related short courses to approximately 3600 students in many different organizations. Dr. Raquet is the recipient of numerous awards, has served in a number of positions within the ION and is an ION Fellow. He received his PhD in Geomatics Engineering from the University of Calgary and MS in Aeronautical/Astronautical Engineering from MIT.

12:00 p.m. - 1:30 p.m., Lunch is on your own.




GPS Resilience for the Warfighter

Time: Monday, July 8, 1:30 p.m. - 3:00 p.m.

This tutorial presents an overview of plans and studies at the GPS Program Office to enhance the resilience of the GPS enterprise. The program goal is to assess satnav-related options that will maintain positioning, navigation and timing services to military warfighters in future conflicts. The course reviews in-process Modernization actions and outlines several near-term study alternatives for possible future enhancements.

John Clark John Clark is a principal engineer at The Aerospace Corporation, supporting PNT resilience alternatives for the Space Enterprise Vision. Prior assignments include systems director of the GPS Systems Engineering Directorate, where Aerospace supported the Navigation Warfare analysis of alternatives and design of M-code, and principal director of the GPS Space Segment, where Aerospace supported design, development and deployment of the modernized IIRM, IIF and GPS III space vehicles. From 2006 to 2013, he also served as SMC/GPV chief engineer. Clark received his bachelor’s degree in physics and his master’s in general engineering from UCLA.




An Introduction to Cryptography with Attention to Navigation

Time: Monday, July 8, 1:30 p.m. - 3:00 p.m.

This tutorial offers a brief, broad and benign overview of cryptography. The first half of the course will explain the three main cryptographic methods: symmetric ciphers, hashes and public key cryptography. We illustrate these methods using a variety of non-navigation examples. We then segue to the second part of the course, which shows where cryptography is used for navigation.

Dr. Jim Gillis Dr. Jim Gillis is a senior project leader in the Data Science and Artificial Intelligence with The Aerospace Corporation. He worked on the Selective Availability and Anti-Spoofing Module (SAASM) team and led the M-code Signal Design Team’s Security sub-team. His current interest includes authentication methods for navigation data and signal verification. He has degrees in System Science and Mathematics from Washington University in St. Louis and UCLA, and a PhD from UCLA.

Dr. Joe J. Rushanan Dr. Joe J. Rushanan is a principal mathematician in the Communications, SIGINT, & PNT Department at the MITRE Corporation. He has worked on GPS for over 20 years, including being part of the M-code Signal Design Team and the L1C Signal Design Team (where he invented the Weil-based spreading codes). He teaches cryptography and mathematics for the cybersecurity program at Northeastern University’s Khoury College of Computer Sciences. He received degrees in mathematics from The Ohio State University and Caltech.




DOD PNT Architecture Standard (PNTAS)

Time: Monday, July 8, 1:30 p.m. - 3:00 p.m.

Description Pending Public Release

Samuel Griffin Samuel Griffin is a digital engineer at Booz Allen Hamilton where he is the chief architect on the PNT Architecture Standard (PNTAS) development effort. Mr. Griffin’s experience spans multiple enterprises, including military satellite communications; remote sensing; range and networks; and positioning, navigation and timing; working in interoperability requirements capture; net-readiness; and enterprise and systems integration roles. Mr. Griffin has an MBA in Space Systems Management from the University of Colorado.




PNT Gaps for Autonomous Applications

Time: Monday, July 8, 1:30 p.m. - 3:00 p.m.

Tremendous amounts of support and energy are currently being poured into the quest for autonomous solutions. The effort spans almost all fields, from research to consumer products and from transportation to defense and space. Underlying many of these autonomous solutions is an assumption of reliable and robust PNT. This course will expound on several current and proposed autonomous solutions and then will highlight the gaps between where we currently are with reliable and robust PNT for autonomy and where some autonomy researchers may be assuming we are.

Dr. Rob Leishman Dr. Rob Leishman is currently the acting director of the Autonomy and Navigation Technology (ANT) Center at the Air Force Institute of Technology, where he is also a research assistant professor of Autonomy in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering. Prior to AFIT, he worked as a research engineer at the Air Force Research Laboratory. He received his PhD in Mechanical Engineering at Brigham Young University in 2013.