JNC Tutorials

Pre-conference tutorials have been organized to provide in-depth learning prior to the start of the technical program. Course materials are the intellectual property of the instructor; an electronic copy of notes may be made available for download by qualified attendees from the meeting website at the instructor’s discretion.

Tutorials are included with the cost of a full registration. ION reserves the right to cancel a portion of the tutorial program based on availability of the instructor.

Tuesday, September 8: 8:30 a.m. - 10:00 a.m.
Approaches for Resilient & Robust Positioning, Navigation and Timing (PNT)
Logan Scott
GPS/GNSS 101
Dr. John Raquet
Introduction to SatNav SDRs using Python: Part 1
Dr. Sanjeev Gunawardena and Mark Carroll
CTS-153 Software
Terrance Nelson
Break, 10:00 a.m. - 10:30 a.m.
Tuesday, September 8: 10:30 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.
Integrity/Assurance of Navigation Systems
Dr. Samer Khanafseh
An Introduction to Cryptography with Attention to Navigation
Dr. Joe J. Rushanan and Angie Wang
Introduction to SatNav SDRs using Python: Part 2
Dr. Sanjeev Gunawardena and Mark Carroll
Using a Sextant: Celestial Navigation
Dr. Richard J. Hartnett
Lunch in Event Center I: 12:00 p.m. - 1:00 p.m.

Approaches for Resilient & Robust Positioning, Navigation and Timing (PNT)

Time: Tuesday, September 8, 8:30 a.m. - 10:00 a.m.

Diverse elements of international infrastructure are critically reliant on GNSS for precise location and time, often in ways that are not obvious. This tutorial will provide a high-level perspective on the effects of interference on GNSS receivers and offers possible threat mitigation approaches and policy recommendations. The tutorial will start with a discussion of potential GNSS threats and vulnerabilities. Then, after a quick review of how receivers determine position, the focus will be on the effects of various interference types on select signals. The effects of ground mobile propagation in limiting effective jammer range will be examined. Mitigations such as adaptive arrays and IMU aiding will be discussed. Civil jamming examples and incidents will be covered, along with methods to detect, identify and militate against their effects. In particular, the importance of maintaining situational awareness for establishing environmental context will be examined. Techniques for detecting spoofing and authenticating signals will be discussed.

Logan Scott Logan Scott has over 40 years of military and civil GPS systems engineering experience. He specializes in radio frequency signal processing and waveform design. He has pioneered approaches for building jamming-resistant digital receivers and has long advocated for hardening civil infrastructure. He is currently consulting with AFRL on waveforms for advanced navigation capabilities. Logan is an ION Fellow and a Senior Member of the IEEE. In 2018, he received the GPS World Signals award. He holds 43 US patents.




GPS/GNSS 101

Time: Tuesday, September 8, 8:30 a.m. - 10:00 a.m.

This course presents the fundamentals of the GPS, and other GNSS, and is intended for people with a technical background who do not have significant GPS experience. Topics covered include time-of-arrival positioning, overall system design of GPS, signal structure, error characterization, Dilution of Precision (DOP), differential GPS, GPS modernization, and other GNSS systems.

Dr. John Raquet Dr. John Raquet is the director of IS4S-Dayton. Previously, he was the founding director of the Autonomy and Navigation Technology (ANT) Center at the Air Force Institute of Technology. Dr. Raquet has a PhD in Geomatics Engineering from the University of Calgary, an MS in Aero/Astro Engineering from MIT, and a BS in Astronautical Engineering from the US Air Force Academy. He has published over 170 navigation-related conference and journal papers and taught 60 navigation-related short courses to over 3600 students in many different organizations. He is the ION’s immediate past president and is an ION Fellow.




Introduction to SatNav SDRs using Python: Part 1

Time: Tuesday, September 8, 8:30 a.m. - 10:00 a.m.

This two-part course aims to provide attendees with a solid understanding of the fundamentals of satellite timing and navigation (satnav) software receivers and associated signal processing. The course is divided into multiple modules, each comprised of a short lecture followed by a python code demonstration that reinforces the topics covered. By the end of this course, attendees will have an understanding of how the provided satnav software receiver works which includes capabilities such as processing of multiband live-sky sampled data files, acquisition and tracking of visible open GNSS signals, and outputting signal observables. This open-source receiver may be further developed to yield a functional satnav SDR that is ideal for research.

Part 1: Satnav signal bands, signal structures, and link budgets; anatomy of a satnav receiver; software-defined radio concepts; front-end architectures; signal processing overview; sampled data analysis; correlation.

Pre-requisites: Basic understanding of digital signal processing, object-oriented programming concepts and the Python programming language are required to understand the software projects provided. Participating in the code demonstration portion is optional. Attendees registered for the code demonstrations will be able to download the demo software project and sampled data files, via external USB3 hard drives and DVDs, from a secure link that will be provided during the course.

Dr. Sanjeev Gunawardena Dr. Sanjeev Gunawardena is a research assistant professor with the Autonomy & Navigation Technology (ANT) Center at the Air Force Institute of Technology. He has over 20 years of experience in RF, digital and FPGA-based system design. His expertise includes satnav receiver design, advanced satnav signal processing, and implementation. He received his BS in engineering physics, BSEE, MSEE and PhD EE from Ohio University.

Mark Carroll Mark Carroll is an Electronics Engineer at the Air Force Research Laboratory Sensors Directorate. He received his BS in Computer Engineering and MS in Computational Science and Engineering from Miami University. His research interests include GNSS, Software Defined Radios (SDRs), and machine learning.




CTS-153 Software

Time: Tuesday, September 8, 8:30 a.m. - 10:00 a.m.

With procurement of ground based, handheld and embedded card variants of military GPS receivers, a need to have a reliable tool to facilitate testing and evaluation of these receivers was addressed with the Compliance Tester Software for the IS-GPS-153 Interface (CTS-153) test tool. CTS-153 was originally developed, at the request of the GPS Joint Program Office (now part of SMC’s Production Corps), to provide a means for test organizations and program offices (representing platforms integrating GPS) to evaluate the interface characteristics, and/or facilitate integration of military GPS receivers compliant with the various revisions of the IS-GPS-153 Interface. The range of GPS receivers conforming to the IS-GPS-153 includes the Precise Positioning Service Security Module (PPS-SM) based PLGR, Selective Availability/Anti-Spoofing Module (SAASM) based DAGR and GB-GRAM, and the M-Code based GB-GRAM-M. The purpose of the CTS-153 tutorial is to provide prospective users and interested parties with an understanding of basic operation of the test tool and useful features available to aid in successful integration of an IS-GPS-153 compliant GPS receiver. With the increasing availability of Military GPS User Equipment (MGUE) Inc 1 M-Code cards, this tutorial provides M-Code integrators timely exposure to the free CTS-153 test tool.

This presentation will consist of a real-time demonstration of useful CTS-153 features, including GPS receiver emulator function, RSAM error test function, as well as the data transfer and Hot Start process. Additionally, the presentation will provide an overview of basic IS-GPS-153 concepts and structure, with an emphasis on best ways to optimize integration of M-Code ground-based receivers. A focus will be placed on newly introduced MSID defined messages, which take advantage of the enhanced capabilities/functions of M-Code signals.

Terrance Nelson Terrance Nelson works for Booz Allen Hamilton where he has supported the Army Product Manager (PM) Positioning, Navigation, and Timing (PNT) and SMC Production Corps organizations for over 15 years in the area of Interface Control document (ICD) and Interface Specification (IS) development, GPS receiver specification development, platform integration support, and risk mitigation assessment. He functions as the primary CTS-153 SME and ICD-GPS-153 serial interface compliance test engineer and has functional experience in the areas of hardware and software design and analysis, including techniques for solving problems involving complex electrical systems. He holds a BS in Electrical Engineering from California State and is a licensed Professional Engineer.


Break, 10:00 a.m. - 10:30 a.m.



Integrity/Assurance of Navigation Systems

Time: Tuesday, September 8, 10:30 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.

In critical navigation systems that involve large risks to financial or human life, the design process of such systems needs to be at high levels of reliability in order to limits such risks. This course introduces the concept of integrity and assurance of navigation systems. The course will start by defining assurance and integrity and how system requirements are derived. The concept of integrity risk tree will then by introduced by using the derived requirements, identifying the system components, fault nodes and fault modes, and allocating the risks among these system components and faults. The tutorial will also present different methods and techniques to address the requirements and allocations, and how to evaluate the system performance during the design process. In addition, validation and verification techniques will be discussed. The course will use different examples from aviation and ground applications for illustration purposes at each step of the navigation system design process.

Dr. Samer Khanafseh Dr. Samer Khanafseh is a research assistant professor at Illinois Institute of Technology, and the cofounder and manager of TruNav LLC. Dr. Khanafseh has been involved in several high integrity and high precision aviation applications such as Autonomous Airborne Refueling (AAR) of unmanned air vehicles, autonomous shipboard landing for the UCAS and JPALS programs and Ground Based Augmentation System (GBAS). His research interests focus on high accuracy and high integrity navigation algorithms for close proximity applications, cycle ambiguity resolution, high integrity applications, fault monitoring and robust estimation techniques. He holds a PhD from IIT in Aerospace Engineering. He received the ION’s Early Achievement Award in 2011.




An Introduction to Cryptography with Attention to Navigation

Time: Tuesday, September 8, 10:30 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.

This tutorial offers a brief, broad and benign overview of cryptography. The first half of the course will explain the three main cryptographic methods: symmetric ciphers, hashes and public key cryptography. We will illustrate these methods using a variety of non-navigation examples. We will then segue to the second part of the course, which shows where cryptography is used for navigation.

Dr. Joe J. Rushanan Dr. Joe J. Rushanan is a principal mathematician in the Communications, SIGINT, & PNT Department of The MITRE Corporation. He was part of the M-code Signal Design Team and the L1C Signal Design Team and the 2019 recipient of ION's Capt. P.V.H. Weems award. He received degrees in mathematics from The Ohio State University and Caltech. In addition, he teaches cryptography for Northeastern University’s Khoury College Cybersecurity graduate program.

Angie Wang Angie Wang is currently a systems director at the Aerospace Corporation and is the chief engineer of the MGUE Increment 1 program. Ms. Wang has experience working with GPS through her work on Enterprise Crypto requirements, Navigation Warfare (NAVWAR), Test Vectors, and leadership of the GPS Functional Security Engineering Team (FSET) Cryptography Working Group. Ms. Wang received a BS in Electrical Engineering from UCLA and an MS in Electrical Engineering from Cal State Long Beach.




Introduction to SatNav SDRs using Python: Part 2

Time: Tuesday, September 8, 10:30 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.

This two-part course aims to provide attendees with a solid understanding of the fundamentals of satellite timing and navigation (satnav) software receivers and associated signal processing. The course is divided into multiple modules, each comprised of a short lecture followed by a python code demonstration that reinforces the topics covered. By the end of this course, attendees will have an understanding of how the provided satnav software receiver works which includes capabilities such as processing of multiband live-sky sampled data files, acquisition and tracking of visible open GNSS signals, and outputting signal observables. This open-source receiver may be further developed to yield a functional satnav SDR that is ideal for research.

Part 2: Acquisition engines; signal tracking techniques and control state machines; inter-frequency aiding; measurement computation; introduction and demonstration of provided python SDR architecture and code.

Pre-requisites: Basic understanding of digital signal processing, object-oriented programming concepts and the Python programming language are required to understand the software projects provided. Participating in the code demonstration portion is optional. Attendees registered for the code demonstrations will be able to download the demo software project and sampled data files, via external USB3 hard drives and DVDs, from a secure link that will be provided during the course.

Dr. Sanjeev Gunawardena Dr. Sanjeev Gunawardena is a research assistant professor with the Autonomy & Navigation Technology (ANT) Center at the Air Force Institute of Technology. He has over 20 years of experience in RF, digital and FPGA-based system design. His expertise includes satnav receiver design, advanced satnav signal processing, and implementation. He received his BS in engineering physics, BSEE, MSEE and PhD EE from Ohio University.

Mark Carroll Mark Carroll is an Electronics Engineer at the Air Force Research Laboratory Sensors Directorate. He received his BS in Computer Engineering and MS in Computational Science and Engineering from Miami University. His research interests include GNSS, Software Defined Radios (SDRs), and machine learning.




Using a Sextant: Celestial Navigation

Time: Tuesday, September 8, 10:30 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.

How do modern navigators use a sextant, chronometer, stars, and almanac information to solve for ship or aircraft position? The fundamentals are likely more straightforward than you realize! Today’s mariner typically uses six tools to solve for vessel position:

  1. An almanac (or computer) that predicts precise location of celestial bodies as a function of time;
  2. A reasonably accurate timepiece;
  3. A device to measure elevation angle of a celestial body (e.g., sextant);
  4. A “star finder”;
  5. A navigational chart; and
  6. A mathematical or tabular method to convert observations to contours (lines) of position.

This short course will cover some theory; however, the primary focus will be on the practice of using these six tools to solve for vessel position. Final discussions will focus on experiences with celestial navigation, with topics to include best times to shoot stars, horizon challenges, sources of error, and typical accuracy.

Dr. Richard J. Hartnett Dr. Richard J. Hartnett is a professor of Electrical Engineering at the U.S. Coast Guard Academy in New London, CT, having retired in 2009 from the USCG as a Captain (O-6). His current research interests include the mathematics of positioning, statistical signal processing methods in electronic navigation, and autonomous vehicle design.


Lunch in Event Center I: 12:00 p.m. - 1:00 p.m.