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Session D6: Application/Impact of PNT Technologies in the Homeland Critical Infrastructure

PNT Assessments of Critical Infrastructure – Find, Fix and Fortify
Greg Gerten and Geoffrey Hella, KBR
Location: Ballroom B
Alternate Number 3

This briefing will focus on the dependance of Position Navigation Timing (PNT) technologies in the critical infrastructure sectors. This briefing will walk through a few unclassified examples and demonstrate a subset of easy to deploy tactics, techniques and procedures (TTPs) that can be put in place today while new material purchases (systems upgrades and backups) can be procured and fielded. We will explore the history of efforts to mitigate both known and unknown vulnerabilities. Rate the effectiveness of these process and procedure to achieve the mandated goals and objectives. Look in the future and outline a way forward to align with guidance and directives.
PNT based technologies, such as GPS, are now an integral part of the national critical infrastructure. In fact the Department of Homeland Security has identified 13 of the 16 sectors that are heavily dependent on GPS for their Position Navigation Timing (PNT) functions. In-additon the DHS has designated positioning, navigation, and timing services (PNT) a “National Critical Function.” Therefore PNT is now, officially, a capability so vital to the United States that its “disruption, corruption, or dysfunction would have a debilitating effect on security, national economic security, national public health or safety.”
Accurate position, navigation and timing (PNT) is essential for the proper function of much of the nation’s critical infrastructure. Traffic signal lights, aircraft, automatic teller machines and military operations all depend on it, mostly in the form of Global Positioning System (GPS) satellite signals. Precise timing is one aspect that is particularly important. Some critical infrastructure systems, including the electric grid, communication networks and financial institutions, require synchronization within one microsecond or better, according to information provided by the Department of Homeland Security’s (DHS’s) Science and Technology Directorate and a government-sponsored study RTI International has found that a GPS outage lasting 30 days could cost the U.S. economy $1 billion each day.
And the reliance on GPS signals is expected to increase dramatically as the nation moves toward smart cities, autonomous automobiles and next-generation communications. “There’s a huge market out there for location-based services. That market is growing rapidly DHS officials assess the vulnerabilities, develop technical solutions and best practices, and engage and inform industry and critical infrastructure owners on the risks and potential mitigations. DHS is working with the Department of Transportation on the Resilient PNT Conformance Framework, which will address needs for civil PNT systems
It is imperative that each organization understand their responsibility in assessing their risk and implementing a risk management program once the systems have been identified, analyzed and assessed from the battery of vignettes (deceived, degraded, denied, disrupted, destroyed).



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