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Session 4: Flight Inspection Technology (including ADS-B and RFI)

Flight Inspection of Aviation Data Links
Thomas Michael Pinnell, Norwegian Special Mission, Norway; Sérgio Marcos da Rocha Corrêa, Department of Airspace Control, Brazil
Location: Regency Ballroom
Date/Time: Tuesday, Apr. 17, 2:15 p.m.

As the congestion of air traffic rises, there is a greater strain put on air traffic control (ATC) to safely manage an air space. Aviation data links contribute towards maintaining and enhancing air navigation services safety and efficiency in all phases of flight. Data link technology can facilitate both communication and surveillance in oceanic and remote airspace. Aviation data links assist in addressing operational shortcomings such as controller pilot misunderstandings, transcription errors, nonstandard phraseology and frequency congestion that are typically associated with the use of voice operations and procedures.
The use of air-to-ground datalink has been endorsed by ICAO as a key enabler for the delivery of benefits foreseen in its vision of a performance based Global Air Traffic Management system. Data Links are implemented in controlled airspace around the world and allow ATC to more precisely monitor an aircraft positions, and more efficiently position and separate aircrafts, including positioning with reduced horizontal and vertical separation minimums, and enhance safety for aircrew and passengers by providing automatic alerts to ATC when an aircraft deviates from the approved flight plan. This technology significantly reduces ATC and flight crew workload, especially during the critical phases of flight – within controlled airspace.
Considering that Aviation Data Link technology, such as the Future Air Navigation System (FANS 1/A), which consists of Controller Pilot Data Link Communication (CPDLC) and Automatic Dependent Surveillance Contract (ADS-C), and PreFANS services such as Digital Clearance (D-CL) and Digital ATIS (D-ATIS) contain ground to aircraft transmitted information and instructions vital for safe navigation through a controlled airspace, this paper will consider the experiences of the inspection of these aviation data links in Brazil. It will summaries the inspection requirements, and real-life experience of the flight inspection organization, explore what technology is currently available to allow them, and other flight inspection organizations, to inspect aviation data links to a standard acceptable to the Flight Inspection and aviation industries.



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